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Every aspect of our existence is now intertwined with the global network. It’s simpler to fly 3,000 miles away than it is to get through traffic in a large metropolis; and information can be shared with everyone at the touch of a button.

AI speech technology created by a business named Sanas is designed in part to improve how individuals who speak a same language but with distinct accents can understand one other, by filtering and transforming accented sounds. Announcing $32 million in fundraising today, the firm comes out of stealth and opens its products to a wider audience.

New supporters GV (previously Google Ventures), strategic backer Assurant Ventures, and angel investor Gokul Rajaram join forces with Insight Partners to make a significant investment in the company. Series A supporters include previous investors Human Capital, General Catalyst, Quiet Capital, and DN Capital. As part of the deal, Alorica, one of the biggest BPOs in the world, is deploying the technology to more than 100,000 workers and 250 business clients throughout the globe.

The corporation isn’t saying how much it’s worth, but we’ve heard it’s $150 million once all the money has been paid out. This is a significant Series A round for a speech AI business, and our understanding is that it comes as a result of Google’s rejection of Sanas‘ takeover bid. As a substitute for purchasing, consider making an investment in them instead.

Sanas’ technology is already being used in call centres, as shown by the company’s roster of investors. If you’re a customer service worker who’s dealing with a client who doesn’t speak your native language well but has a thick accent, you’re likely to be the target of abuse.

BPO behemoth Alorica’s other clients include the huge collection agency business ERC and the tourism sector BPO, IGT. According to Sanas’ CEO and co-founder Maxim Serebryakov’s gloomy commentary on the status of our society, the decrease in agent harassment has been substantial as a consequence of the use of the technology.

Both to develop Sanas’ company in that sector, as well as to begin shaping up for new use cases in the workplace, such as video calls or voice-based interactive services to assist computers grasp a broader variety of accents, will be the goal of the money.

Every aspect of our everyday life is more interconnected than ever before. Traveling to a faraway destination may be simpler than navigating the traffic of a major metropolitan area, while access to information and products can be gained by anybody at the touch of a button.

AI speech technology created by a business named Sanas is designed in part to improve how individuals who speak a same language but with various accents can understand one other, by filtering out accented voices and transforming those accents into others in real time. As it emerges from the shadows and sells its products more publicly, the business has announced $32 million in fundraising.

GV (previously Google Ventures), strategic backer Assurant Ventures, and angel investor Gokul Rajaram all contributed to the investment, which is being led by Insight Partners. DN Capital, General Catalyst, Quiet Capital, and Human Capital are all participating in this round. As part of the deal, Alorica, one of the biggest BPOs in the world, is deploying the technology to more than 100,000 workers and 250 business clients throughout the globe.

Even though the corporation isn’t saying how much it’s worth, we’ve calculated that it’s about $150 million. This Series A round is one of the largest ever raised by a speech AI business, and it comes as a result of Google’s rejected takeover offer to Sanas. In the event that you are unable to purchase them, consider investing instead!

Since Sanas has a number of high-profile backers, their technology is already being used in contact centres. Far-flung customer service providers, specifically, have been the target of a lot of abuse because of their extremely accented customer support representatives.

Customers of Alorica include insurance company Assurant as well as a significant collection agency business ERC and a tourism industry BPO. Shockingly, Maxim Serebryakov, Sanas’ CEO and co-founder, indicated that deploying technology in these settings has had a substantial impact on reducing agent harassment.

Sanas intends to use the funding to expand its business in that vertical as well as to begin shaping up for other use cases in the enterprise, for example, as a plug-in for video calls or for voice-based interactive services to help machines (and ML-based systems) understand a wider range of accents.

However, there are counterarguments to each of these claims as well. Sanas has decided not to develop any consumer apps or make its technology available to the general public at this time because of the potential for abuse. As an added measure of security, Sanas does not allow its users to access or produce their data on the cloud as many of its competitors do.

Disguising one’s genuine identity is unquestionably a more pressing problem that we must all deal with on a daily basis. So although these barbs continue to hurt, this is helping individuals who get them and making it simpler for people (including those who are well-intentioned) to communicate with one other without accents interfering.

As part of my interview, Sanas had one of their clients’ representatives in India call me and spoke with me in his native Indian accent before switching to a neutral midwestern tone. While being aware of what was going on in the background was a bit unnerving, I was somewhat aback by how natural it all appeared. His speech was clear, but maybe a little robotic and emotionless; he sounded like a robot.

As far as I know, that’s a deliberate feature at the moment, and it might change if consumers and other users want it to.

Call centres are low-hanging fruit, Serebryakov added, citing the difficulty of establishing what is essentially ground-breaking technology as well as its compatibility with the use case as the reason for their emphasis. “It was crucial to us that we take the shortest route possible while developing this.” Only non-emotional communication is permitted, including no singing, laughing, or joking about. What we’re attempting to do is offer these users more choice over how they connect with one other at work.” Baseball and the call centre are two places where sobbing is prohibited.

MD Ganesh Bell of Insight Partners stated in a statement, “Insight Partners is excited to expand its engagement with Sanas on such cutting-edge and transformational technology.” For many Sanas workers, English as a second language is an issue, and I look forward to working with this bright and committed team to create a solution that addresses this issue, as well as many others, when the firm emerges from its stealth period.”