How hybrid education is transforming the classroom for the better

To guarantee that all students obtain a high-quality education in the future, educational institutions will need to ensure that both online and offline students are treated equally.

Oxford’s Sad Business School is using a variety of methods to deliver on this reality. It has been two years since the school updated its classrooms and lecture halls to enable an immersive experience that employs video-conferencing technology, displays and whiteboards to bring offline and online students together in a single classroom environment.

Sad supports online teaching via the use of the content management systems Canvas and Moodle, as well as the video conferencing system Zoom. Students from all around the world may access personalised information via GetSmarter, a third-party partner of the business school.

Even though today’s technology makes it possible for students to get their education either entirely online or in person, Bramwell thinks it may be difficult to combine the two.

In other words, although the quality of online instruction has improved dramatically in the last two years, there is still more to be done to guarantee that online sessions are at least as rich as those experienced in a physical classroom.

It’s essential, though, that you make that transition. In order to meet the rising demand for lifelong learning from time-crunched professionals, universities must combine campus-based and online teaching methods.

Many classes will be offered online, with others still taking place on site.

CarringtonCrisp and EFMD conducted a poll of business school graduates and found that 51% of those surveyed wanted to continue their education and 77% of those surveyed wanted online access to courses.

According to Mark Bramwell, CIO of Sad Business School, a 24/7 learning approach using a variety of modalities, including face-to-face instruction, online platforms, and virtual classrooms, is part of the school’s blended service.

At its core, “learning” is all about making information available at a moment that is most convenient and suitable for the folks who will be using it, as stated by one researcher.

For some students, face-to-face learning will continue to be the most convenient method of learning. At Sad, students from all over the world have returned to the classroom in historic numbers, according to Bramwell. 97% of this year’s MBA class hails from outside the United States, with students from 62 different nations.

For some pupils, remote learning will be the most important.

Whether it’s on their phone, the subway, or the route to work, “people may want to assimilate material,” he adds. “The pill can be a good option for them to swallow it just before they go to sleep. We’re here to give the technological platforms that allow people to study at their own pace and at a time that works best for them.”

This is one of the most essential lessons the school has already learned.

It is especially difficult for lecturers who have to address a real class as well as manage an online cohort, turn slides, check who’s sending messages via chat, and remember to draw both sets of students into the dialogue.

That reality and how you can make a virtual member feel included in an online hybrid class may be difficult to reconcile, adds Bramwell.

A high-quality educational institution will need to guarantee that both online and offline students get the same level of education in the future.

There are a number of methods being used at Sad Business School at the University of Oxford to implement this reality. During the last two years, the school has updated its classrooms and lecture halls to offer an immersive experience that utilises video-conferencing technology, displays, and whiteboards to bring offline and online students together.

Sad supports online teaching via the use of technologies like as Canvas, Moodle, and Zoom video conferencing. In addition, the business school collaborates with third-party companies like GetSmarter to provide students all around the world with personalised material.

Bramwell believes it may be difficult to combine online and face-to-face instruction at the same time, despite the fact that technology supports both options well.

So, although online education has improved dramatically over the last two years, there is still more work to be done to guarantee that web-based classes are at least someplace near to the depth of experience in a real class.

However, making that change is essential. Professionals who value their personal and professional freedom are driving an increase in the need for universities to provide both on-campus and online courses.

There will be some classes held on-site, but the majority will be delivered online.

An education research organisation and accrediting authority found that more than half of business school graduates (51 percent) would prefer access to lifetime learning programmes, and that 77 percent would like online access for lectures.

According to Mark Bramwell, CIO of Sad Business School, blended learning at Sad includes a drive toward a 24/7 learning paradigm that utilises a variety of modalities, including face-to-face instruction, online platforms, and virtual classrooms.

At its core, “learning” is all about making information available at a moment that is most convenient and suitable for the people who need it.

As technology continues to advance, some students may still prefer to study in person. As Bramwell points out, students from all over the world are returning to Sad in historic numbers. In this year’s MBA class, students come from 62 different countries, making about 97% of the total.

For certain pupils, remote learning will be crucial.

On the subway, on the way to work, or even just when on their phone: that’s where people may want to consume material, he adds. “Before kids go to bed, they may want to read it on their iPad. Individuals may study at a time and place that is most convenient for them since we supply the technological platforms.”

The value of support jobs has already been recognised by the institution.

Lecturers who have to address a physical class, manage their online cohort, turn slides, check who’s putting messages through through chat, and remember to draw both sets of students into the discourse face the greatest obstacle when delivering hybrid classes.

There’s a delicate balancing act involved in making a virtual student feel included in a hybrid class, adds Bramwell.